Delaware Bird-A-Thon team during their 2017 Big Day
Delaware Bird-A-Thon

Tips for Raising Money

Hannah Greenberg | February 27, 2018 | No Comments

Raising money for the Delaware Bird-A-Thon may seem like a daunting task. Here are a few easy tips to get you started on your fundraising journey to help the birds, and remember, any amount of money raised helps!

Set a Goal

Setting a goal not only gives you something to work towards, but also gives your donors a better understanding and definition of the cause. Set a goal that’s attainable, but challenging! Start your first year with whatever feels comfortable, whether it’s $50, $100, or $5000, and work your way up from there.

Tell A Story

When requesting money for the Delaware Bird-A-Thon, make sure to tell a story, make it personal and relatable to your potential donors. Why do you care? How are you connected to the cause? What will the money be used for and why is it so important to you?

Give Options

Would your donors prefer to donate per species seen? If so, make sure to give them an estimate of how many birds you think you could see, and then follow up with your exact species total after the big day.  If they’d prefer to donate one flat amount, direct them to the website, the mailable donate form, or collect a check.

Use Social Media

Share the event on your personal social media pages to get the word out to even more people. Make sure to share it early on, and then closer to your big day. Post pictures of birds that could be helped, yourself birding, or habitats that have been saved by the Bird-A-Thon. Live post pictures during your big day to get people excited about the cause!

Follow up

Once you’ve gotten your donations and reached your goal, make sure to stay in touch with your donors. After the event, contact them with a follow-up including a story about your birding adventure. Did you see any life birds? Did something crazy happen? Let them know, and send along a few pictures of your day!

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ABOUT AUTHOR
Hannah Greenberg

Hannah has been involved with Delmarva Ornithological Society since 2013 when she found herself on the Ashland Hawk Watch Hill, and instantly fell in love with birding. She has since joined the DOS council as the Flyer co-editor, and as a member of the Conservation Committee. Hannah works as a Field Biologist for Sarver Ecological, LLC.

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